Who am I? What’s my name?

It’s been quite a while since I last updated my blog.

In my last entry I wrote about my ongoing struggle to overcome bouts of severe depression caused by the sudden onset of my arthritis.

Since then a lot has changed.

I started self-injecting 150mg of cosentyx. I had intentions of blogging weekly, providing updates of how I was getting on. But I just couldn’t bring myself to do it. Why? I was scared.

Allow me to explain.

My first cosentyx injection was a success. I successfully self-administered which is a big deal for someone who previously had such a phobia of needles and injections that even just thinking about a needle would cause me to feel dizzy and sick. I was, as expected, quite lethargic for the first few days afterwards, but I felt pretty ok.

It was just 3 days later that I first noticed a difference. The psoriasis on my forehead had pretty much completely disappeared. I thought I was imagining it, maybe I was seeing a clear forehead because I wanted to. A couple days passed and I realised my scalp psoriasis, which was chronic for 14 years, had cleared by about half. But still, I was too scared to say anything. What if it didn’t last? What if it was a temporary effect? What if this was a false sense of security, and it was going to flare up even worse? I didn’t want to tempt fate.

But then my Mum commented on how clear my face was. My boyfriend whispered in hush tones that my scalp was clear, also scared to jinx it. A clear arm followed. A leg. The other arm. The other leg. Within about 2 weeks I was completely psoriasis free.

Just let that sink in.

COMPLETELY.

PSORIASIS.

FREE.

But still, I was too scared to share this. For the first time in my entire adult life I could wash my hair like a normal person. I was no longer scratching an arm until it bled. No longer leaving a trail of flakes behind me.

It was quite frankly, overwhelming.

My body started to improve too. I wasn’t stiff. I could walk with ease. Heck, I could even jog if I wanted to. My right hand started to return to normal and I was able to shake work colleague’s hands in the run up to Christmas because for the first time in a long time, the pain of a hand shake didn’t bring me to tears. I could hold a pen and write in handwriting that almost looked like my own again. Sure, I was still pretty tired and perpetually full of cold, but you pick your battles.

I knew I’d been pretty quiet about my experience when my boyfriend asked me why I hadn’t blogged about it.

And now for the next conundrum.

I, for the second time in two years, no longer knew who I was.

I was going through an identity crisis. Again.

I knew who I was before I developed arthritis. I was a runner. I was an avid life lover. I loved to dance. I loved to travel, to do ‘stuff’. I struggled, for a very long time, to work out who I was with arthritis. I was no longer bubbly, cheery, no longer able to wear the same clothes or shoes, no longer able to run, to go out, to do anything I wanted. I withdrew, I no longer made an effort with my appearance, I gave up. I learnt about the spoonie community and wholeheartedly threw myself in to it on Instagram. I started to establish who this new Rebecca was. She was still there, just slower.

And just when I started to work out who I was, I changed again.

I have deleted pretty much all of the photos I shared on Instagram to do with my health. I started to dress a little more like my old self. I’m taking better care of myself. I had a haircut. I’m back at the gym. I’m training for the marathon. Yes, you did read that correctly. Training for a marathon. I distanced myself from the spoonie community. Thinking this would help me to feel ‘normal’. But even updating my blog doesn’t feel like the right thing to do and I don’t know why. I still have my arthritis, it’s just hidden right now.

It’s something doctors never tell you, is it? Identity crisis caused by a chronic illness. I knew I was feeling grief for my old life, but I never realised just how much I as a person had changed. How little I knew myself.

I sound really ungrateful for the cosentyx, and I’m not, not at all. It’s giving me a second shot at life. It’s just overwhelming. I’d almost finally come to terms with life in the slow lane, and suddenly, everything changes again. No wonder I’m exhausted.

So where do I go from here? I don’t know. I just don’t know.

Answers on a postcard please.

 

 

3 thoughts on “Who am I? What’s my name?

  1. So happy for you! Thank you for sharing. Gives me hope. Keep writing, though. All of us are on journeys and I am now being placed on a biologic in addition to Mtx. It it hell defining one’s life with this disease. You don’t know what to expect. Like you wrote, how long will this last – good times and bad. I hope the meds can improve my life and the lives of others… Thanks again.

    Like

  2. my brain isn’t cooperating in trying to effectively communicate my thoughts and feelings but i have to tell you how much reading that meant to be you were able to articulate so eloquently many of the same struggles i currently face thank you so much for sharing your journey

    Like

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